STAR MONOGRAPH SERIES


Monograph 1
THE EXCAVATION OF A STALLED CAIRN AT THE POINT OF COTT, WESTRAY, ORKNEY
by J Barber

About one third of this cliff-edge site had been lost to coastal erosion when it was excavated in 1984 and in situ preservation was not possible. Full excavation facilitated detailed analysis of the architecture and depositional history of the site while extensive radiocarbon dating demonstrated intermittent use for inhumation and constant exploitation of the site by otters, dogs, birds and latterly by rabbits. The site's interpretation implies, inter alia, that chambered cairns were easily erected and as easily lost from the field record; that inhumation was the common burial practice and that totemism did not form part of the Neolithic rituals associated with chambered cairns.

Date of publication: 1997   ISBN: 0 9519344 3 0   Pages: 96   Illustrations: 24 (B&W)   Plates: 8 (Colour)

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Monograph 2
THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF A PREHISTORIC LANDSCAPE: EXCAVATIONS ON ARRAN 1978-81
edited by J Barber

Survey and excavation were undertaken to inform decision making about the management of the cultural resources around the Machriewater/Blackwater catchment, then under threat from afforestation. Mesolithic spreads, Neolithic settlement sites and field systems, extensive Beaker Period, Later Bronze Age and Iron Age landscapes of hut groups, clearance cairns, burial cairns, field banks and agricultural remains, together with Dark Age fields, all form part of the palimpsest of sites within the research area. Pedological processes like podzolisation, gleying and peat formation have caused geochemical changes in virtually all of the soil contexts of these sites and this aspect of the human interaction with the landscape is considered in some detail.

Date of publication: 1997   ISBN: 0 9519344 4 9   Pages: 195   Illustrations: 85(B&W)   Plates: 16 (Colour)

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Monograph 3
THE LAIRG PROJECT 1988-1996: THE EVOLUTION OF AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL LANDSCAPE IN NORTHERN SCOTLAND
edited by R P J McCullagh & R Tipping

The upgrading of the road between Bonar Bridge and Lairg, Sutherland provided access to an area rich in archaeological remains. From 1988 to 1991 an intensive programme of survey and excavation was undertaken which recorded evidence of vestigial Neolithic settlement, extensive Bronze Age settlement and agriculture and its subsequent collapse. After 500 years, during the Iron Age, settlement and extensive agricultural landuse resumed and persisted until circa AD 1000. Thereafter, the land was dominated by pastural landuse. The final extensive phase of settlement was reflected by the excavation of a turf long-house from which the tenants, like so many of their neighbours, were probably cleared in 1807. Focusing on the dynamic relationship between the successive human populations and the landscape, the project has sought to chart the duration and impact of each major phase of landuse through various artefactual and ecofactual studies. These approaches, including soil pedology, plant macrofossil studies and palynological analysis, were supported by the most extensive radiocarbon-dating programme to date in Scotland.

Date of publication: 1998  ISBN: 0 9519344 5 7   Pages: 255  Illustrations: 114(B&W)   Plates: 9 (Colour)

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Monograph 4
THE HISTORY OF A SCOTTISH LOWLAND CRANNOG: EXCAVATIONS AT BUISTON, AYRSHIRE 1989-90
by Anne Crone

Excavations at Buiston Crannog revealed that extensive occupation deposits still survived, despite drainage of the surrounding loch and subsequent excavation in the 19th century. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the crannog was initially built during the period of Roman occupation, but dendrochronological analysis of the structural timbers has demonstrated that the bulk of the surviving occupation deposits relate to a short period of activity in the first half of the 7th century AD. Settlement on the crannog consisted, at any one time, of a single round house within a defensive perimeter and analysis of the macroplant remains and the invertebrate assemblage have provided insights into the conditions in which these structures were inhabited. A wide range of organic artefacts, primarily wood and leather, was recovered, complementing the rich inorganic artefact assemblage retrieved during the 19th century excavations. The natural environment of the crannog, the nature of the settlement, and the status of the inhabitants and their relationship to the ruling elite of British Strathclyde are amongst the themes explored in this text.

Date of publication: 2000  ISBN:0 9519344 6 5  Pages: 326   Illustrations:109(B&W)  Plates 10 (Colour)

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Monograph 5
ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS AT JEDBURGH FRIARY 1983-1992
by Piers Dixon, Ian Rogers & Jerry O'Sullivan

This report presents an illustrated account of the excavation of the remains of buildings identified as a sixteenth-century house of the Observantine Friars. The evidence points to a gradual development of the Friary, from the initial construction of the north range in the early 1500s through the addition of other buildings which would ultimately enclose a central cloister. The waters of the adjacent Skiprunning Burn were managed by the friars, with drains led into a lade or water-channel diverted from the stream. Analysis of building materials, artefacts and ecofacts recovered during the excavation provides insights into the diet and living conditions of the friars.

Date of publication: 2000   ISBN: 0 9519344 7 3   Pages: 94   Illustrations: 33(B&W)

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Monograph 6
AN IRON AGE COASTAL COMMUNITY IN EAST LOTHIAN: THE EXCAVATION OF TWO LATER PREHISTORIC ENCLOSURE COMPLEXES AT FISHERS ROAD, PORT SETON, 1994-5
edited by Colin Haselgrove & Rod McCullagh with Pamela Lowther & Coralie Mills

The farm lands between the Forth and the Tyne represent one of the richest areas in Britain for crop-mark sites, many of them evidently the remains of Iron Age enclosed settlements. New housing developments at Fishers Road provided a unique opportunity for the detailed investigation of two adjacent enclosures within the space of a single year. Interlinked by a series of over 50 radiocarbon dates, the two investigations encompass extensive studies of the archaeological remains, artefacts, animal bones, plant remains and sediments. The dating programme indicates that the two Fishers Road sites were in contemporary use for at least part of their lives, leading to an exploration in this account of the nature of the relationship between them.

Date of publication: 2000   ISBN: 0 9519344 8 1  Pages: 273   Illustrations: 97(B&W)

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Monograph 7
INVERESK GATE: EXCAVATIONS IN THE ROMAN CIVIL SETTLEMENT AT INVERESK, EAST LOTHIAN, 1996-2000
by M C Bishop

During the period 1996-2000, excavations of the Roman Vicus associated with the Roman Fort were conducted by AOC Archaeology within the scheduled area in the grounds of the Inveresk Gate estate at Inveresk, East Lothian. This was done in advance of development by Cala Homes (Scotland) and was a consequence of earlier important discoveries by Gordon Maxwell and Gordon Thomas. As well as confirming the results of the earlier excavations, the AOC excavations enhance understanding of the development of the Roman Vicus and the life within it. The excavations also demonstrate new evidence for how the Roman fort was constructed, and waste management during the occupation of the fort. The Inveresk Gate excavations also suggest that Inveresk had a strategic role for the Romans occupation of Southern Scotland, independent of the Antonine Wall. This Monograph is essential reading for the study of the chronology and nature of the Roman occupation of Southern Scotland.

Date of publication: 2004  ISBN: 0 9539978 0 5  Pages: 262  Illustrations: B&W

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Monograph 8
RITUALS, ROUNDHOUSES AND ROMANS: EXCAVATIONS AT KINTORE, ABERDEENSHIRE 2000-2006: VOLUME 1 FOREST RD
by Murray Cook and Lindsay Dunbar

This is the first of two volumes on the series of archaeological excavations carried out by AOC Archaeology at Kintore, Aberdeenshire. The sites all lie within a Roman temporary marching camp but the settlement sequence stretches from the Neolithic through to the Mediaeval period. The evidence is superlative - from the largest assemblage of Neolithic pottery in Aberdeenshire, the largest cluster of roundhouses excavated anywhere in Scotland to the largest number of Roman bread ovens excavated on any military site in the Empire!

Date of publication: 2008  ISBN: 978 0 9539978 2 4  Pages: 405  Illustrations: 197(B&W)

PRICE: 30.00 + 5.00 P&P per volume

 

OTHER PUBLICATIONS


 

INTERPRETING STRATIGRAPHY: CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS, 25TH NOVEMBER 1992, EDINBURGH (PAPERBACK)
Edited by J Barber

A Number of themes emerged from the conference on stratification in Edinburgh on 25 November, 1992. The first of these was the evolution of procedures for the post-excavation analysis of very large sites. The lectures by Shepherd, Steane and Hammer, et al are presented here and seem to indicate the emergence of a commonality of philosophy and approach on urban sites which is mirrored in Lowe's description of AOC (Scotland) Ltd's approach to deeply stratified rural sites.

Date of publication: 1993  ISBN: 0 9519344 2 2  Pages: 75   Illustrations: 51(B&W)

PRICE: 5.00 + 2.00 P&P per volume